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Thursday, September 01, 2011

MilSpouses are you taking the 19th Amendment Seriously?

Ok so this post is to the women military spouses. Sorry guys but I need to speak to the ladies. Last night I was invited to a leaders meeting here in Cumberland County. We were discussing how can we get more people involved and interested? I believe people have just forgotten about the rights that were fought for them so long ago. Now is the time to learn about what is affecting us, economics, healthcare, education, and military issues. These all affect us as women, mothers and wives. BTW I am not this bra burning liberal or a gun toting conservative I am in the middle.

I have been involved in the community all my life from when I was in middle school. I remember my grandparents taking me to phone banks and standing outside the polls passing out information. The right to vote is a very serious right that people sometimes take for granted. Being a woman and a minority it is especially important to get your vote out. There have been a lot of spouses who I have spoken with around the US, who say they do not vote. This really disappoints me. For number one there are a lot of things that happen on the local level, that affects you. Did you know that the City of Fayetteville has annexed Fort Bragg, so that means we can vote in city/county elections. You just have to register where you live. It is super easy to register to vote. Ok so being a woman and being a minority are huge things. If you do not exercise your right to vote then you should not complain about what is happening in the government. Believe it or not things start at the local government, what happens in DC affects everyone.

Being a military spouse I understand it is a little difficult to vote, but you can. There are a lot of things you have to do. Give up your permanent state driver's license, register in another state and the county where you live in. Maybe you aren't doing it because you own property in another state but if you don't I urge you to get involved in these local elections. If you live off the installation, it is important there are things that you can take advantage of in the community.

Let me give you a brief history lesson of the Women's suffrage movement which is the right of women to vote and to run for office. The expression is also used for the economic and political reform movement aimed at extending these rights to women and without any restrictions or qualifications such as property ownership, payment of tax, or marital status. Lydia Chapin Taft was an early precursor in Colonial America who was allowed to vote in three New England town meetings, beginning in 1756, at Uxbridge, Massachusetts. Following the American Revolution, women were allowed to vote in New Jersey, but no other state, from 1790 until 1807, provided they met property requirements then in place. In 1807, women were again forbidden from voting in the state. Equal rights became the rallying cry of the early movement for women's rights, and equal rights meant claiming access to all the prevailing definitions of freedom. In 1850, Lucy Stone organized a larger assembly with a wider focus, the National Women's Rights Convention in Worcester, Massachusetts. Susan B. Anthony, a native of Rochester, New York, joined the cause in 1852 after reading Stone's 1850 speech.

Women's suffrage activists pointed out that blacks had been granted the franchise and had not been included in the language of the United States Constitution's Fourteenth and Fifteenth amendments (which gave people equal protection under the law and the right to vote regardless of their race, respectively). This, they contended, had been unjust.

There are some places in the world where WOMEN can't vote or it has conditions, like in Saudi Arabia...So my advice to you is, please get informed, get educated on the issues, if you don't understand, email me and we can work through this together.

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